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Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii)

By Ann C Wooledge
on June 01, 2012

Palmarosa (Cymbopogon martinii) Essential oil.  

We recommend that all essential oils be used diluted and with the proper education provided to you by your health care provider or certified aromatherapist. There are many places you can purchase essential oils, but we recommend that you consult with an educated provider or purchase blends from educated providers. Essential oils are powerful medicines and when used incorrectly can cause harm. Please read our Disclaimer before using our products.

Although some websites will say that this oil is a skin irritant and to avoid use in pregnancy. Our research did not find this to be an issue, in fact, one of our favorite aromatherapy textbooks, Aromatherapy for Health Professionals, by Shirley and Len price refers to Palmarosa as being a "uterotonic oil which facilitates delivery" and they provide what they call the "Boudoir" blend as follows:

Thyme essential oil - Thymus vulgaris ct (chemotype) geraniol - 3 ml (there are 5 ml's to a teaspoon)

Palmarosa essential oil - Cymbopogon martini - 3 ml

Clove (it doesn't say leaf or bud, but they are much the same) - Syzygium aromaticum: 0.5 ml

Vegetable carrier oil: 13.5 ml

Instructions: "6 to 8 drops massaged over the belly several times a day to stimulate labour if the mother is post-term. Or the same quantity over the lower back every half hour during labour itself."

Our favorite book on essential oil safety is well...Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Tony Balacs. They have comments concerning the constituent geraniol and refers to oral dosing, which we do not recommend regardless of the oil unless under the advice and guidance from an aromatherapy professional who has demonstrated hours of education and expertise. They also state that geraniol may have the potential to lower blood pressure. They consider Cymbopogon martinii to not be a skin irritant nor sensitizer, not phototoxic with no cautions or warnings noted.

Once I finalize the blend for the Candida that we used for the yeast overgrowth, I'll put it up on the website for sale with all of the ingredients declared. Plus, we will be adding Palmarosa to our Bugz Off essential oil blend so it can be used for dust mites and most likely for bed bugs - but I'm still finishing up the research and testing on that one.

Keep ALL essential oils out of reach of children or pets, dilute prior to use. Use and store in the amber dropper safety caps provided. Keep out of sunlight or high temperatures. Do not take orally without proper supervision by a healthcare provider and/or certified aromatherapist.

Cassia (Cinnamomum cassia) Essential Oil

By Ann C Wooledge
on February 01, 2012

Cassia (Cinnamomum cassia) essential oil 

Due to its high level of cinnamic aldehyde please use caution when using this oil. It has historically been used in the flavoring industry and studies that have shown its very beneficial properties, as detailed above, have been with oral use. This oil makes a very good antiseptic mixed with water or in a diffuser. It is, however, one of the strongest skin irritants and skin sensitizers in the field of aromatherapy. Previously most aromatherapists, including myself, would tell you to never, ever use this oil topically. However, after listening to a webinar by Robert Tisserand, who wrote the classic textbook on aromatherapy safety, said that it could possibly be used because of how highly antibacterial it was but at no greater than 0.5% usage. His book has stated that it is "not useful for aromatherapy", but he did change his view point during this webinar. I would say do not use it without the guidance of a qualified, trained clinical aromatherapist. Having seen so many horrible wounds and so many cases of MRSA during my nursing career, I have to be excited about the possibilities of this particular essential oil and hope to do some studies in the near future. For what it's worth - and I think it's worth a lot - China has been using this essential oil medicinally for several thousands of years. They are so far ahead of us where healthcare is concerned.

Also please note: If used concurrently with any other anti-platelet and/or anti-coagulant medications this essential may increase the risk of bleeding. 

Oregano essential oil (Origanum vulgare)

By Ann C Wooledge
on October 23, 2011

Oregano essential oil (Origanum vulgare)

Undiluted, pure aromatherapy grade. Do not use internally without first consulting with a qualified healthcare professional and this oil should be diluted with carrier oil prior to use. This particular essential oil is often sold in health food stores diluted with other ingredients. The oil we offer here is not diluted and is not adulterated with other ingredients. Due to its high content of the chemical constitutent Carvacrol, this oil will inhibit platelet aggregation, which means it decreases the bloods natural ability to clot. So do not use prior to surgery and or immediately following surgery. And do not use if you are currently on any other blood thinners such as aspirin, Plavix or Coumadin. 

HIGHLY IRRITATING TO THE SKIN AND MUCOUS MEMBRANES. I have on occasion, accidentally, touched the side of the bottle when putting it away and there may have been a drop on the outside of the bottle. I then put my hand to my mouth and it hurt - a lot! I had to immediately wash my entire face and hands. I should and usually do remember to whip the outside of the bottles and wash my hands thoroughly after pouring any oils - but especially this oil. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN - PLEASE!!

Please see our disclaimer. You will find additional in-depth information in our Essential Oil Database along with research information (under construction)

Thyme, Red (Thymus vulgaris)

By Recipes for a Healthier You Appetite Control Snacks
on August 31, 2009

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris) essential oil - safety and usage information coming soon.

Lemon (Citrus limonum) – Organic

By Melody Hansen
on August 31, 2009

This is such a wonderful, fresh, clean essential oil, but did you know it is also a SOLVENT - as are other citrus essential oils. I use it to dissolve grease, dirt and grime - as well as cleaning the label glue off of recycled bottles. So - what I'm saying here is this is not something you want to put in your water every day as some companies recommend. Your liver will thank you if you don't. It makes a very good - and very healthy - addition to any of your cleaning products, use in a diffuser, and even add it to your massage oil or cream. It has so many benefits, BUT it is also a phototoxic oil, meaning that if you use this topically, don't go out into direct sunlight or a sunbed for 12 to 24 hours because it can cause a slight reaction to a severe burn. Dilutions are important. Essential oils are concentrated extracts from plant material - many times concentrated from that slice of lemon you put in your glass of ice tea. We only purchase and sell certified organic citrus oils. Why? Because citrus oils (most anyway) are not steam distilled as are other essential oils, but are cold-pressed from the RIND. Yes - and that is where the pesticides and herbicides are most concentrated.

Another thing to consider with citrus oils - they oxidize and this can alter fairly quickly the important chemistry of the particular essential oil. Which is why we buy only fresh citrus oils from our supplier. We keep all of our citrus oils refrigerated and suggest you do the same. All essential oils should be stored tightly closed, leave the top off only long enough to drop the oils into whatever you are diluting it with, and keep in dark glass containers. We ask that you not remove the safety dropper cap supplied and keep them out of reach of children. It's alway a good idea to write the date on the bottle that you have received and opened the essential oil in order to keep track of the age of the oil.

Clove Bud (Syzgium aromaticum)

By Recipes for a Healthier You Appetite Control Snacks
on August 31, 2009

 Clove Bud (Zyzgium aromaticum) Essential Oil

As the long list of properties indicated, it is quite obvious that clove bud essential oil would be a good one to keep around the house. It works very well when added to other essential oils. See our recipes below (under construction - sorry). 

STRONG CAUTIONS:

This particular oil due to its high level of Eugenol is a skin sensitizer, it will be a skin irritant if not diluted properly, and it is an anti-coagulant and should not be used by anyone currently taking any other blood thinners, and before or after surgery. The anti-coagulant/anti-thrombotic properties can be very helpful for vascular issues however. Always consult your health professional and/or certified aromatherapy professional. Keep out of reach of children!! We provide our oils with a safety dropper cap - please leave that on. An oral dose of 5 to 10 ml for a child as young as 2 can result in acute liver damage or death.

Cinnamon Leaf (Cinnamonum verum)

By Ann C Wooledge
on August 31, 2009

Cinnamon Leaf Essential Oil

Due to the high levels of the chemical constituent Eugenol, cinnamon leaf essential oil should not be used by anyone who is currently on blood thinning medications, including over-the-counter or supplements such as Nattokinase. It also should not be used prior to surgery or following surgery - just as your doctor will tell you to stop taking your aspirin. This oil is also a strong skin irritant, meaning that it should never be put directly on the skin unless properly diluted.

Please see our Disclaimer, our Essential Oil Database and our Safety and Caution statements.

Carrot Seed (Daucus carota)

By Ann C Wooledge
on August 31, 2009

Carrot Seed Essential Oil

An easy do-it-yourself way to incorporate the antiwrinkle, cell-renewing properties of this essential oil is mix the following blend into any of your favorite unscented cream (our unscented hand & body cream would be good for this purpose.)

Add to 8 oz of cream or your favorite carrier oil. See our carrier oil benefits page to help you decide which one to use for your skin type.

5 drops Geranium (Pelargonium graveolens) essential oil
5 drops Patchouli (Pogostemon cablin) essential oil
5 drops Carrot Seed (Daucus carota) essential oil
5 drops Rosemary, ct Verbenone (Rosmarinus officinalis)
5 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)
5 drops Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea)

Safety or Cautions: Carrot seed essential oil is considered to be non-toxic, and non skin-sensitizing. As with all oils, this oil must be diluted with a carrier prior to use. Please check the link to the individual essential oils noted in the recipe for safety/usage information. See our Essential Oil Database for more information.

IMPORTANT: All of our products are for external use only.

We also suggest you have a good working knowledge of the use of essential oils or consult with an aromatherapy professional prior to use. In addition, Essential Oils must be properly diluted before use in order to avoid any damages to property or adverse physical effects (including injury or bodily harm). Please read our Disclaimer before using our products.

Cajeput (Melaleuca cajeput)

By Ann C Wooledge
on August 31, 2009

Cajeput (Melaleuca cajeput), also known as Melaleuca leucadendron

Family - Myrtaceae
Steam distilled - leaves and twigs

For an in-depth discussion of the properties and benefits of this Cajeput essential oil, please visit our growing Essential Oil Database.

Cajeput was not one of the oils in my original aromatherapy certification class, so it was a few years before I actually became acquainted with it. I love it now for so many reasons. It has the same familiar aroma to me as our Stay Awake Blend, which is a blend of Rosemary, Eucalyptus, and Peppermint. I could have just used Cajeput! It has been described as penetrating, camphorous and medicinal. I don't think medicinal, but that is such a subjective term. I will be making a soap with it after testing a little bit more. 

Cajeput essential oil is distilled from the fresh leaves and twigs of the paperbark tree according to most sources. It has a long history of being used successfully to combat colds, flu and chronic arthritis. It was apparently also prescribed for cholera. It has been said that this particular oil would be the one to grab for immediately at the onset of any respiratory infections accompanied with aches, pains, chills and congestion. I usually know when my immune system is fighting off a "bug" when I get a sore, scratchy throat. I've found that our Cold & Flu blend with some raw honey has always, and I do seriously mean always, stopped it in its tracks. I would imagine that cajeput alone would do the same thing. It contains a high percentage (although in the literature there was a wide range of "typical" chemical constituents for this essential oil, particularly in the amount of 1,8-cineole.) We can assume though that it consists mainly of 1,8-cineole, followed by a-pinene  and b-pinene. 

The other amazing property of this Cajeput essential oil is it's ability to clear the mind and, therefore, I think would be a wonderful oil to put in your diffuser or your nasal inhalers (coming soon to Wingsets). 

Safety/Cautions: From my research, it appears that this oil is non-toxic and nonsensitizing; however, may irritate skin if used in high concentrations. One should use care and caution during pregnancy.

IMPORTANT: All of our products are for external use only.

We also suggest you have a good working knowledge of the use of essential oils or consult with an aromatherapy professional prior to use. In addition, Essential Oils must be properly diluted before use in order to avoid any damages to property or adverse physical effects (including injury or bodily harm). Please read our Disclaimer before using our products.

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia)

By Ann C Wooledge
on August 31, 2009

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia) essential oil

Bergamot is by far one of my favorite essential oils. If I feel anxious or pushed to meet a deadline, but need to focus - I reach for bergamot and/or geranium, but I particularly like the bergamot if I'm feeling "hot" either mentally or physically. It has so many amazing qualities that you can find detailed in our expanding essential oil database

In particular the chemical constituents in this oil attribute to it's calming and sedative properties. Predominately you will find the monoterpene (d-limonene), monoterpenol (linalol) and the ester (linalyl acetate). The percentages of each of these constituents will differ from batch to batch due to the many variables involved in growing and distilling the plants. These three, however, should be the predominant features in any Bergamot essential oil.  Linalool (you'll see it spelled linalol also) provides the antibacterial as well as the sedating, relaxing properties to this oil. Linalyl acetate is also known to provide very relaxing properties, which is also one of the constituents seen in Lavender essential oil and why high altitude lavender has the most relaxing properties. The monoterpene, d-limonene, according to Kurt Schnaubelt in his book, Advanced Aromatherapy, has anti-viral properties. Other sources recommend Bergamot for issues related to the herpes virus. The d-limonene also contributes significant anti-inflammatory properties to this oil. Buyer beware - according to Kurt Schnaubelt, this is one oil that is often adulterated in the marketplace, which is why we so carefully source ours.

Highly phototoxic if not used according to guidelines. Bergamot is one of those oils that the IFRA recommends to not exceed 0.4% in "stay-on" products, which would include a massage oil or a body cream. Bergamot is a particularly nice perfume as a stand-alone oil and, therefore, should be diluted prior to use. This percentage would equate to approximately one drop of the oil to one ounce of a carrier oil. When used in a diffuser, 2 to 4 drops would suffice. The safety issues are more related to the skin and direct UV light. We previously carried a bergapten-free oil which is rectified to remove the phototoxic qualities, but the last sample we received just didn't hit the mark that we strive for. I recently received the sample of the oil we have now which is not bergapten-free and does carry the issues of phototoxicity, but it smells truly wonderful.

A few of our favorite uses for this oil:

Can be added to a face mask for acne due to its antiseptic and astringent properties or add to your regular bottle of shampoo and conditioner if you have oily hair. The literature also recommends this essential oil for eczema. I'm having my daughter test this new shipment to see how her eczema responds to it.

Body powder (deodorizing and refreshing)

2 parts tapioca starch (or cornstarch, organic preferred)
1/2 part orrisroot (fragrance fixative, easily found at health food stores)
1 part baking soda
1 part zinc oxide (deodorizing due to antibacterial properties)
Bergamot essential oil - using the dilution of 0.4%, which would be approximately 1 drop per 1 ounce of powder.
Lovely and uplifting, refreshing powder. Can be placed in a shaker bottle (we will be carrying these) or just a glass jar with a tight lid.

Perfume: (Put in a 2 oz sprayer bottle if using vodka, a roller ball if using a carrier oil)

1 tsp vodka or 1 tsp carrier oil (such as almond oil or olive oil)
8 drops of lavender essential oil
2 drops of rose absolute or rose otto
4 drops of bergamot essential oil
8 drops of vanilla essential oil
1 drop of ylang-ylang essential oil

For more detailed information, please take a look at our essential oil database on this oil.

Safety/Cautions: Bergamot contains furocoumarins, notably bergapten, which causes skin sensitization and skin pigmentation when exposed to direct UV light for up to 12 hours. It can and has caused severe burns when used on sensitive skin that is subsequently exposed to sunlight or sunbed rays. The maximum concentration for most oils in concentration with a carrier is somewhere around 5%, but the IFRA recommends Bergamot to not exceed 0.4% in products that will not be washed off. We follow those guidelines in our products that contain Bergamot.
Avoid in cases of liver problems. Not for use when pregnant or nursing. Possible skin irritant – dilute well.

IMPORTANT: All of our products are for external use only.

We also suggest you have a good working knowledge of the use of essential oils or consult with an aromatherapy professional prior to use. In addition, Essential Oils must be properly diluted before use in order to avoid any damages to property or adverse physical effects (including injury or bodily harm). Please read our Disclaimer before using our products.

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